Uncategorized Posts

Press Button: Academia Is Eating Its Young

Press Button: Academia Is Eating Its Young

Bijan Sabet: Who took a chance on you?

Bijan Sabet: Who took a chance on you?

How To Make Money Via Email

Last week’s traffic generation lesson was about measurement; an extremely important topic, but admittedly not really capable of directly generating traffic on its own. Today’s lesson is different. In fact, experience tells me that for many established traditional small and medium businesses it is the single most valuable avenue for immediate qualified web traffic growth. That’s not an exaggeration; I would put money on it more often than not. (My bet would change depending on the industry, because certain industries are already almost leveraging it to its full potential.)

Today’s magical topic is email lists. The starting points on this vary greatly; many businesses already maintain a somewhat active mailing list, some collect addresses but don’t do anything valuable with them, and some don’t collect any email addresses at all. I’m going to assume the latter and start from the ground floor; if your business is past that then just keep reading—we’ll get to your case shortly.

How to Make Money by Measuring Things

A while ago, I wrote an email course for Black Chair about how small businesses can use their websites more effectively. You can sign up for it here, but you don’t have to, because over the next several weeks I’ll be reproducing that series on this blog. (Side note: this is one of the reasons “people” talk about writing “evergreen content“—I think I’m going to be too busy to blog over the next several weeks but I can reuse this thing I wrote months ago.) The first unit is about measurement, which I think is important.

Good measurement is crucial, because otherwise it’s impossible to tell which of your marketing efforts are working and which aren’t. Measuring actions on your website is really easy (using tools like Google Analytics or KISS Metrics), but the important part is knowing which metrics matter for your business.

On Learning, and Music, and Programming

In high school, an amazing and kind old giant of a man named Mr. Bills found me playing guitar in the hallway during lunch hour. His soft, low voice slipped through the brambles of his impressive beard as he complimented my music and asked if I would ever like to play the cello. I was surprised—I had never noticed him before, and unlike the other adults in the building he was reaching out to me as a friend; as an equal. We spent the rest of that school year meeting in his small office at lunch as he taught me where to find the notes and how the bow could make them sing. Mr. Bills had such a simple way about him, a method of teaching undoubtedly carried over from his years of working with special needs children, where he would feed me just enough information to run with and then watch where I could take it. He was endlessly patient, and utterly confident in my abilities—at least, that’s how he let me feel.